Revue de presse

Les vins du Domaine Duroché à Gevrey-Chambertin en Bourgogne, sont régulièrement dégustés et commentés par les journalistes suivant :

 

www.timatkin.com

TOP 25 RED WINE PRODUCERS (CÔTE D’OR)
Domaine Armand Rousseau
Domaine Comte Georges de Vogüé
Domaine Confuron-Cotetidot
Domaine Christophe Perrot-Minot
Domaine de la Romanée-Conti
Domaine de la Vougeraie
Domaine de Montille
Domaine Denis Mortet
Domaine du Comte Liger-Belair
Domaine Dujac
Domaine Duroché
Domaine Emmanuel Rouget
Domaine Faiveley
Domaine Fourrier
Domaine Georges Noëllat
Domaine Georges Roumier
Domaine Hudelot-Noëllat
Domaine Jacques-Frédéric Mugnier
Domaine Jean Grivot
Domaine Leroy
Domaine Méo-Camuzet
Domaine Ponsot
Domaine Robert Chevillon
Domaine Sylvain Cathiard
Domaine Taupenot-Merme

97 points Dom. Duroché, Chambertin Clos de Bèze GC
(£POA) One parcel only, but what a parcel it is. Pierre Duroché seems to have the measure of this vintage, knowing just how much to extract from his grapes. This is deceptively forward and drinkable with succulent raspberry and red berry sweetnes, but it’s underpinned by sap, subtle tannins and acidity. 2017-27

96 points Dom. Duroché, Charmes-Chambertin GC
(£720 FW) The Duroché family only have half a hectare of Charmes, spread over five parcels of comparatively young vines. But what a wine this is, super sweet, silky, sensuous and supported by 50% new oak. Delicate, forward and graceful with cinnamon spice and refreshing bite. 2016-24

96 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin PC Lavaut-St-Jacques
(£480 FW) Pierre Duroché’s Lavaut (spelt with a t) is one of the best examples of this under-rated vineyard close to the Combe (canyon) behind Gevrey-Chambertin. Succulent yet refined, this shows hints of pepper spice, sweet complexity and a fine, mouthwatering finish sustained by acidity. 2017-25

96 points Dom. Duroché, Latricières-Chambertin GC
(£880 FW) There’s not a lot of this to go round - only a few hundred bottles from a mere 0.25 hectares - so you might have to rush to secure a few of them. Floral and pale in colour, with notes of rose petal and subtle red fruits, well-integrated oak and a sweet, nuanced finish that is almost reminscent of Chambolle-Musigny. 2016-24

95 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin PC Estournelles-St-Jacques
(£POA) The Durochés’ parcel of Estournelles is situated right next to the more famous Clos St. Jacques and often shows some of the same freshness and bite. In 2012, this is pale, delicate and refined with sweet red fruits curled around a core of spicy, crunchy minerality. 2016-22

95 points Dom. Duroché, Griotte-Chambertin GC
(£POA) Unlike the 2012 Griotte, this has been aged in 100% new oak and is a little more marked by toastiness than is ideal. There’s only one (new) barrel, however. The wine is sweet, smoky and slightly coconutty, but has plenty of tannin and concentration to develop further in barrel and bottle. Give it time. 2018-28

94 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin Aux Etelois
(£POA) A very well situated village level wine, made from three parcels that are next to Griotte- Chambertin, but sold at less than a quarter of the price. Long and fine, with red cherry and pomegranate notes, fine tannins and a sweet, sikly finish, this is remarkable value. 2016-24

France, Burgundy: Pierre Duroché - A Gevrey Star Ascending

April 30, 2015

How the hell have I missed Duroché? Mea culpa. I've driven past their gates in the middle of Gevrey village countless times and clocked the signage, but had neither the time nor the wherewithal to check out what lies beyond. That's my loss. Wrist duly slapped. Because when I did finally pull up my socks and arrange a tasting with winemaker Pierre Duroché, I was poured the kind of red Burgundy wines that put a big fat grin on my face: poised and terroir-driven, but delivering fruit and complexity. These were wines both articulate and eloquent. I had to disguise my elation as I tasted through virtually their complete range of 2012s and 2013s, the latter having been bottled the previous month.

"I am the fifth generation of winemaker," Pierre said, as I sat down to taste in the winery. He comes across as a relaxed, passionate young winemaker, perhaps a little self-effacing, perhaps just coming to terms with the praise that his wines are beginning to garner. Apart from his penchant for classic rock and reggae (Toots & the Maytals - an excellent choice, sir), Pierre's passion outside fermented grape juice is rock climbing. In fact, he is proficient at a very high level and spent two years with the French team. Just take a look at this picture - it makes this vertigo-suffering writer dizzy just looking at it!

However, winemaking is central to his family. His wife has worked at Domaine Tortochot and is presently working at Jacques Cacheux in Vosne-Romanée. He has two sisters, one married to a winemaker in the Jura (Domaine de la Borde) and the other working in a hospital and married to the son of Jean-Michel Guillot.

"I always was interested in making wine since I was very young," Pierre continued. "So I spent a lot of time in the vineyard. But I had a normal schooling. I got a 'scientifique baccalauréat' in 2000 when I was 18, and afterwards I completed a BTS in oenology and viticulture in Beaune. I spent six months in Châteauneuf du Pape at Château La Gardine from September 2002 to February 2003. It was a memorable harvest. And I visited other domaines in Australia, California and Spain. But for me it was very important to learn more the terroir in Burgundy than winemaking in other place."

 

I asked Pierre if he remembered his first wine. "I can't remember my first wine. I was too young, but it was a wine of my father of course!" He did mention, however, one or two particular wines that have inspired him, such as Claude Dugat's Griotte - Chambertin 1999 and Armand Rousseau's Chambertin Clos-de-Bèze.

The history of the domaine actually stretches back further than I expected.

"The first bottling was in 1933 by my great-grandfather. My grandmother's family owned Domaine Thomas and these were joined with his grandfather's holdings. We presently farm 8.5-hectares in Gevrey alone. My father Gilles started in 1973 and he retired in December. I started in 2005, working in the vineyard and doing the vinification. I have changed a lot of things but it was not a revolution, just more attention in detail. This is very important. I'm very glad that my parents and grand parents have kept the old vineyards! We don't use herbicides and use nothing against botrytis apart from some copper sulphate, though occasionally we use treatments when the weather is bad. We have a large number of very old vines, so the yields are low and we don't do any green harvest."

I have listed the domaine holdings below alongside the date of planting:

Chambertin Clos de Bèze: 0.2530 hectare, -1920
Latricières-Chambertin: 0.2757 hectare -1965
Griotte-Chambertin: 0.0192 hectare -1964
Charmes-Chambertin: 0.4121 hectare -1959, 1971, 1981, 1990 and 1998
Gevrey-Chambertin Lavaut St Jacques: 1.2025 hectare -1923 to 1971
Gevrey-Chambertin Estournelles St Jacques: 0.1277 hectare -1981
Gevrey-Chambertin Champeaux: 0.1340 hectare -1986
Gevrey-Chambertin Aux Etelois: 0.3473hectare -1971
Gevrey-Chambertin Champ: 0.7077hectare -1969 and 1973
Gevrey-Chambertin Les Jeunes Rois: 0.3340hectare -1953
Gevrey-Chambertin Le Clos: 0.3917hectare -1998
Gevrey-Chambertin Villages: 2.8724hectare -1951 to 1980
Bourgogne Rouge: 0.4977hectare -1969 and 1985
Bourgogne Blanc: 0.4019hectare -2003 and 2005

 

You'll notice that morsel of Griotte-Chambertin and perhaps also my lording of the 2012. This must constitute one of the most elusive wines in Burgundy. In 2012 there was just 80-liters eked from 172 vines that are ostensibly a continuation of their parcel in les Etelois. It is so minute that Pierre told me that after their debut 2007 the authorities prohibited its production because it was so negligible. Fortunately in 2011 Pierre asked customs if it was possible to bottle after a change in the law and it was allowed.

"The Griotte was blend into Gevrey-Chambertin village before," he said. "When I took over from my father I decided to try to vinify this very small part separately. It was conclusive. So in 2011 we started to sell some of the bottles and it was a great success! The vinification is the same as the other vats but it just needs a lot of attention. I use some whole bunch: 100% in 2012 though in 2013 it was destemmed and in 2014 I used around 75% whole bunch. I'll probably continue to vinify this cuvée with a large percentage of whole bunch since the 2012 was a good success. I have ordered an 86-liter barrel for the 2013 vintage to age the wines?it was just due to the quantity of the harvest. I have a small stainless-steel vat for the fermentation."

I then asked Pierre about the modus operandi in the winery.

"Because we do so much work in the vineyard, usually we do not need to do a lot of sorting. With respect to the winemaking, after complete destemming we put the grapes in the vat and ferment with natural yeast: no enzymes, just a bit of sulphur. We do remontage and pigeage depending on the vintage, each appellation with the same approach. We used 10% to 20% new wood for the premier crus and 30% to 75% for the grand cru, mainly from the Cadus cooperage plus some Cavin and Billon."

Pierre's 2012 delivered between 13.5% and 14% natural alcohol degrees. The wines were deeply impressive and I would have eloped with any of them (if I could.) Each wine brimmed over with intensity, precision and poise, Pinot Noir that will drink early but also with the propensity to age. Don't overlook entry-level cuvées such as the Gevrey-Chambertin les Jeunes Rois 2012 that punches well above its reputation. I admit that I thought this would be a hard act to follow, but the follow-up village cru "les Etelois" was just as enthralling and it just got better from there. In fact, they were so good that to be frank, there is not a huge gap between those and the Charmes-Chambertin and Latricières-Chambertin. Though the 2012 showed a little more consistently than the 2013s, I appreciate the style of the wines here that do bear semblances to Armand Rousseau.

What I like about Duroché is that they capture the essence of terroir. There's a sense of edginess, a transparency about these wines that express both place and season. Along with Domaine Heresztyn virtually next door, Gevrey is now nurturing a new generation of winemakers who are turning round domaines that were the "also-rans" of the appellation and turning them into front-runners, thereby widening the choice for consumers. I cannot wait to taste Pierre's 2014s hopefully later this year, but if after the tasting, he invites me for a quick but of rock climbing - I'll politely decline.

Tim Atkin :

TOP 25 RED WINE PRODUCERS (CÔTE D’OR)

Domaine Armand Rousseau
Domaine Bruno Clair
Domaine Comte Georges de Vogüé
Domaine Confuron-Cotetidot
Domaine Christophe Perrot-Minot
Domaine de la Romanée-Conti
Domaine de la Vougeraie
Domaine Denis Mortet
Domaine du Comte Liger-Belair
Domaine Dujac
Domaine Duroché
Domaine Faiveley
Domaine Fourrier
Domaine Georges Lignier
Domaine Georges Noëllat
Domaine Georges Roumier
Domaine Hudelot-Noëllat
Domaine Jacques-Frédéric Mugnier
Domaine Jean Grivot
Domaine Leroy
Domaine Méo-Camuzet
Domaine Rossignol-Trapet
Domaine Sylvain Cathiard
Domaine Taupenot-Merme
Olivier Bernstein

97 points Dom. Duroché, Chambertin Clos de Bèze GC

(£POA)

There may be only a single parcel of this vineyard, but what a parcel it is. With 20% whole bunches and plenty of oak to complement the old vine complexity, this is an ambitious red that needs time in bottle to reach its apogee. Textured, compact and dense, this is a much more backward wine than the 2013. 2020-30

97 points Dom. Duroché, Griotte-Chambertin GC

(£POA)

Showing a slight volatile lift in 2014, this is still deliciously sweet and supple, all blackcurrant, summer berries and juicy, supple tannins. Comparatively forward in style with masses of perfume and palate-caressing flavours. Almost drinkable now. 2017-26

96 points Dom. Duroché, Latricières-Chambertin GC

(£990 L&W)

This single parcel of 0.25 hectares is located just after Chambertin, with less of the Combe Grisard-derived freshness than some examples. Black fruits, bold tannins, a twist of white pepper, plenty of oak and a backbone of acidity: this is a wine that will age beautifully. 2020-30

95 points Dom. Duroché, Charmes-Chambertin GC

(£752 FW, L&W)

Five scattered parcels make up the 0.41 hectares of the Duroché holdings, with an average age of 45 years. This is very impressive in 2014, with dense, smoky oak complemented by plenty of gutsy, plum and blackberry fruit concentration and savoury tannins. 2019-29

95 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin PC Estournelles-St-Jacques

(£552 L&W)

From a vineyard located high on the slopes above the village, next to the Clos Saint Jacques, this is comparatively deeply coloured for a Duroché wine. The oak is very stylishly done here, complementing the flavours of liquorice, black cherry and cinnamon spice. 2019-28

94 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin PC Lavaut-St-Jacques Vieilles Vignes

(£POA)

Made for the first time in 2014 as an old vine cuvée, this is still quite closed at the moment, with prominent oak on the palate. But there’s plenty of underlying concentration and fruit weight, complemented by the freshness that’s typical of this Premier Cru. 2020-29

94 points Dom. Duroché, Gevrey-Chambertin Aux Etelois

(£354 L&W)

Located next to Griotte-Chambertin, but “only” a village wine, this is often the outstanding bargain chez Duroché. Concentrated, sumptuously oaked and weighty, yet with a backbone of chalky freshness and sweet blackberry and raspberry fruit. 2018-26

Pierre Duroché's profile has risen dramatically in recent months and yes, maybe I am partly to blame. But you have only to look at the wines to see who is really culpable. I have noticed even my most conservatively-minded Burgundy friends whose narrow focus extends little further than DRC or Roumier, are asking about this new "kids on the scene." The 2015s continue in a similar vein to Pierre's recent vintages. Even in a fruit-driven growing season such as 2015, there is a restraint and transparency throughout his wines, a focus on precision and terroir expression. That probably explains why out-priced Rousseau buyers have sought out Pierre's wines. They are generally impressive across the board, notably at a village cru level that punches around premier cru weight and also at the grand cru level, as you would expect. Sure the Griotte-Chambertin is predestined to be catnip to those who are turned on by rarity: there are only 80 bottles this year. However, it was his Latricières-Chambertin that really caught my eye and as I state in my tasting note, is probably the best that Pierre has ever made. As always, quantities are tiny and with demand seeming to increase each year, place any allocation requests as soon as possible.

 

Robert Parker Wine Advocate Reviewers’ Choice: The 50 Best New Releases from 2015

Selected from the 30,000+ tasting notes published by our reviewers during the year, these were the most exciting new wine releases from 2015, based on absolute Quality, Singularity and Hedonistic / Intellectual appeal. In no particular order, these wines all represent the pinnacles of greatness while spanning a broad range of countries, regions, grapes and styles: 2013 Domaine Duroché Chambertin Clos de Bèze Grand Cru, Burgundy, France.

 
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